Kitsune's cute sweets combine flavor with fashion

French/Japanese brand Maison Kitsune is known for trying new things. First established as a fashion label, then expanding into music, Kitsune's aspirations are in curating total aesthetic experiences rather than focusing on one specific medium. Now, the brand has launched the Kitsune Cafe, a culinary collaboration with traditional wagashi maker Toraya.

article/images/202/original.jpgvia tabelog.com

Maison Kitsune is rooted in a New Classic style, taking old and traditional designs and arranging them in fresh, new ways. Toraya is a fitting collaborative partner, given that the shop has worked with everyone from the Japanese imperial family to contemporary artists like Yayoi Kusama. Toraya's Kitsune designs capture the simple motifs of the Kitsune brand, while also conveying the centuries old traditional craftsmanship of wagashi.

via re-colle.com The Kitsune Fuku and Tama Kitsune retail for ¥480 (plus tax).

On the far left is the Kitsune Fuku, made from white tsukune potatoes. Moist and mild on the outside, the inside is filled with red bean paste. On the right is the Tama Kitsune (fox ball), with subtle variations in hue created by applying red bean paste. The pairing of these fox-themed treats gives two distinct interpretations of the Kitsune fox—one more literal and cute, the other simply hinting at the idea with colors and texture. It's a fitting juxtaposition of traditional and modern Japanese design.


Cafe Kitsune

3-17-1 Minamiaoyama,Minato-ku ,Tokyo, Japan 107-0062

2 minutes walk (144 meters) from Omote Sando station (exit A4) off the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line, Hanzomon Line, and Ginza Line.Open from 9:00AM to 8:00PM (last order: 17:30)

Holidays: None



Kitsune launched in 2002. Gildas Loaëc works as the music director, while Kuroki Masaya is the fashion director.

Kitsune Cafe collaborator Toraya, is renowned for its refined wakashi creations. Centuries old in Japan, the brand more recently gained popularity in Paris after establishing a shop there in the 1980s.Read more about Toraya's beautiful eatable artworks here.